NEWS WEB EASY・やさしい日本語で書いたニューズ

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Recommended for:

Beginner Intermediate 

Intermediate

Build these skills:

Reading

Reading Aloud/Speech

Native Exposure

Summarisation

Essay/OP Writing

How to use this site

Outlined here are some tips on how to use this site to study most efficiently and effectively.

Beginner Intermediate and Intermediate

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Reading

If you don’t know too many Kanji yet, this site can be helpful with how to read them because they have 振り仮名 furigana (the hiragana above characters). But we recommend doing a read-through first without the furigana and then going through with them or with an aid like Rikaikun and add to your Anki deck on the topic you are reading about.

To get rid of the furigana for your first read-through go to, 漢字の読み方を消す.

Also reading through while listening is a great way to naturally get the readings and accents of kanji you don’t know! So on all of your read-throughs click ニュースを聞く and listen and mouth along (see why in reading aloud/speech)

This site also has a feature where places, peoples’ names, and company names are highlighted in different colours. This is to let you know “don’t worry if you can’t read this, it’s a name of somewhere or someone”. I think that this can get in the way of your study. It’s important to get used to recognising what is a name and what is just a regular word. So go to ことばの色を消す and get rid of the highlighting.

It also has added explanations for words that are underlined – usually places or names. Again great for that second read-through.

Intermediate learners should stay away from the furigana and colour highlights. Instead, try a kanji stroke app or website like 通用漢字筆順辞典 or 書き順. This will get you used to looking up words like a native speaker.

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Reading Aloud/Speech

We recommend reading aloud (or mouthing) to yourself, recording yourself, or if you want instant feedback, Siri!

ニュースを聞く:This site is amazing because it also has a native speaker reading recording so you can speak along – a technique called shadowing – with a native speaker! Shadowing is exactly how you learn pronunciation as a child (or even now) in your own language! It’s a super natural way to get that extra accent training in!

Reading aloud or mouthing the words allows both your brain and muscles to remember the words and how to say them.

Recording yourself and listening back to it lets you hear your accent and where you stumble or break up a sentence oddly. You may be a beginner, but noticing these things now and ironing them out is much easier!

Siri is a language learner’s best friend! Set up your device in Japanese or just chat into google translate and see how well it transcribes what you say! This gives you instant feedback about how you are reading and how well you are pronouncing everything.

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Native Exposure

At this level, we don’t expect you to be able to understand news broadcasts that are read at a native level. But it’s never too early to start listening!

普通の記事を読む is where you can find the original article and usually the original broadcast too!

After reading through at your level, and comprehending the text, head there and take a listen. You might hear the same words or notice Kanji that were in the article you read.

 

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Summarisation

Read through the text and then in your own words, summarise what was said.

If you remember back to primary school, you most likely did something similar. So use questions like 「どこで起こった?」or 「この記事はだれについてだった」

If you want to go even deeper, start giving your opinions/solutions to the issues raised in the article. 「OOだと思った」

Remember! Japanese academic writing is in short or casual form, not desu and masu. But if you want to practice summarising and then speaking you might want to write it out politely (masu/desu).

For Intermediate learners, you’ll want to start using common N3 grammar like に対する、と比べたら etc. 

 

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Essay/OP Writing

Use the article to start your own discussion about the issue.

Argumentative essays are a good place to start. Or comparative essays between your own country/situation. Ask our teachers about persuasive writing!

You could even start your own blog!